Tina Wilson

Assistant Professor
phone 604 822 2383
location_on 2080 West Mall Room 237

Research Area

About

Tina Wilson is an Assistant Professor in the School of Social Work. She works broadly speaking on the evolving encounter between scientific and social movement knowledges as they converge within professional social work and social welfare infrastructures. These encounters include changing understandings of social progress and social justice, and the radical challenge posed by the environmental crisis to established human welfare systems.

Dr. Wilson comes to UBC from Glasgow Caledonian University, Scotland, where she was a SSHRC postdoctoral fellow in the School of Health and Life Sciences. She completed her Vanier Canada supported PhD in Social Work at McMaster University with a specialization in Gender Studies and Feminist Research. Her doctoral research explored generational structures of feeling in the recent history of critical and justice-centric academic social work in Canada, tracing how loosely shared generational standpoints shape the perceived scope of social work. Prior to entering the academy, she worked for about 15 years in direct practice in Toronto, Canada, primarily as front-line staff in the youth and women’s homeless shelter systems, in staff training and program evaluation, and in various forms of worker, network and social movement organizing. She remains committed to the everyday pragmatics of place-based anti-poverty work.


Research

Dr. Wilson’s current work includes archiving with Library and Archives Canada an oral history project created with retired social work academics and wrapping up a comparative study of inclusion of the natural environment in contemporary social work policy and education in Canada and Scotland. She is also Co-Investigator of a SSHRC funded project exploring the integration of environmental justice and sustainability in direct social work practice.


Publications

Wilson, T.E., Lynch, H., & Fisch, V. (2022). Raising the “environmental question” in social work in Canada and Scotland. International Social Work. https://doi.org/10.1177/00208728221094415

Wilson, T.E. (2022). “Passing on” critical social work. In S. A. Webb (Ed.), Routledge handbook of international critical social work: New perspectives and agendas. Routledge (in press).

Wilson, T.E. (2021). An invitation into the trouble with humanism for social work. In V. Bozalek & B. Pease (Eds.), Post-anthropocentric social work: Critical posthumanism and new materialist perspectives (pp. 32-45). Routledge Advances in Social Work.

Wilson T.E. (2021). Surveying critical and social justice-emphatic academic social work in Canada. Canadian Social Work Review / Revue canadienne de service social, 38(1), 25-45. https://doi.org/10.7202/1078388ar

Wilson, T.E. (2020). Social work stories: Situated views and larger visions in disciplinary scholarship and education. Social Work Education: The International Journal, 39(5), 572-583. http://doi.org/ 10.1080/02615479.2019.1703930

Wilson, T.E. (2017). Repairing what’s left in social work, or, when knowledge no longer cuts. British Journal of Social Work, 47(5), 1310-1325. http://doi.org/10.1093/bjsw/bcw114

 


Additional Description

Areas of Scholarship: Social work and environment; history and philosophy of social work; critical social theories; generational standpoints; social justice; social work rhetoric.

Areas of Practice: Homelessness; youth work; community work; program evaluation.


Tina Wilson

Assistant Professor
phone 604 822 2383
location_on 2080 West Mall Room 237

Tina Wilson is an Assistant Professor in the School of Social Work. She works broadly speaking on the evolving encounter between scientific and social movement knowledges as they converge within professional social work and social welfare infrastructures. These encounters include changing understandings of social progress and social justice, and the radical challenge posed by the environmental crisis to established human welfare systems.

Dr. Wilson comes to UBC from Glasgow Caledonian University, Scotland, where she was a SSHRC postdoctoral fellow in the School of Health and Life Sciences. She completed her Vanier Canada supported PhD in Social Work at McMaster University with a specialization in Gender Studies and Feminist Research. Her doctoral research explored generational structures of feeling in the recent history of critical and justice-centric academic social work in Canada, tracing how loosely shared generational standpoints shape the perceived scope of social work. Prior to entering the academy, she worked for about 15 years in direct practice in Toronto, Canada, primarily as front-line staff in the youth and women’s homeless shelter systems, in staff training and program evaluation, and in various forms of worker, network and social movement organizing. She remains committed to the everyday pragmatics of place-based anti-poverty work.

Dr. Wilson’s current work includes archiving with Library and Archives Canada an oral history project created with retired social work academics and wrapping up a comparative study of inclusion of the natural environment in contemporary social work policy and education in Canada and Scotland. She is also Co-Investigator of a SSHRC funded project exploring the integration of environmental justice and sustainability in direct social work practice.

Wilson, T.E., Lynch, H., & Fisch, V. (2022). Raising the “environmental question” in social work in Canada and Scotland. International Social Work. https://doi.org/10.1177/00208728221094415

Wilson, T.E. (2022). “Passing on” critical social work. In S. A. Webb (Ed.), Routledge handbook of international critical social work: New perspectives and agendas. Routledge (in press).

Wilson, T.E. (2021). An invitation into the trouble with humanism for social work. In V. Bozalek & B. Pease (Eds.), Post-anthropocentric social work: Critical posthumanism and new materialist perspectives (pp. 32-45). Routledge Advances in Social Work.

Wilson T.E. (2021). Surveying critical and social justice-emphatic academic social work in Canada. Canadian Social Work Review / Revue canadienne de service social, 38(1), 25-45. https://doi.org/10.7202/1078388ar

Wilson, T.E. (2020). Social work stories: Situated views and larger visions in disciplinary scholarship and education. Social Work Education: The International Journal, 39(5), 572-583. http://doi.org/ 10.1080/02615479.2019.1703930

Wilson, T.E. (2017). Repairing what’s left in social work, or, when knowledge no longer cuts. British Journal of Social Work, 47(5), 1310-1325. http://doi.org/10.1093/bjsw/bcw114

 

Areas of Scholarship: Social work and environment; history and philosophy of social work; critical social theories; generational standpoints; social justice; social work rhetoric.

Areas of Practice: Homelessness; youth work; community work; program evaluation.

Tina Wilson

Assistant Professor
phone 604 822 2383
location_on 2080 West Mall Room 237

Tina Wilson is an Assistant Professor in the School of Social Work. She works broadly speaking on the evolving encounter between scientific and social movement knowledges as they converge within professional social work and social welfare infrastructures. These encounters include changing understandings of social progress and social justice, and the radical challenge posed by the environmental crisis to established human welfare systems.

Dr. Wilson comes to UBC from Glasgow Caledonian University, Scotland, where she was a SSHRC postdoctoral fellow in the School of Health and Life Sciences. She completed her Vanier Canada supported PhD in Social Work at McMaster University with a specialization in Gender Studies and Feminist Research. Her doctoral research explored generational structures of feeling in the recent history of critical and justice-centric academic social work in Canada, tracing how loosely shared generational standpoints shape the perceived scope of social work. Prior to entering the academy, she worked for about 15 years in direct practice in Toronto, Canada, primarily as front-line staff in the youth and women’s homeless shelter systems, in staff training and program evaluation, and in various forms of worker, network and social movement organizing. She remains committed to the everyday pragmatics of place-based anti-poverty work.

Dr. Wilson’s current work includes archiving with Library and Archives Canada an oral history project created with retired social work academics and wrapping up a comparative study of inclusion of the natural environment in contemporary social work policy and education in Canada and Scotland. She is also Co-Investigator of a SSHRC funded project exploring the integration of environmental justice and sustainability in direct social work practice.

Wilson, T.E., Lynch, H., & Fisch, V. (2022). Raising the “environmental question” in social work in Canada and Scotland. International Social Work. https://doi.org/10.1177/00208728221094415

Wilson, T.E. (2022). “Passing on” critical social work. In S. A. Webb (Ed.), Routledge handbook of international critical social work: New perspectives and agendas. Routledge (in press).

Wilson, T.E. (2021). An invitation into the trouble with humanism for social work. In V. Bozalek & B. Pease (Eds.), Post-anthropocentric social work: Critical posthumanism and new materialist perspectives (pp. 32-45). Routledge Advances in Social Work.

Wilson T.E. (2021). Surveying critical and social justice-emphatic academic social work in Canada. Canadian Social Work Review / Revue canadienne de service social, 38(1), 25-45. https://doi.org/10.7202/1078388ar

Wilson, T.E. (2020). Social work stories: Situated views and larger visions in disciplinary scholarship and education. Social Work Education: The International Journal, 39(5), 572-583. http://doi.org/ 10.1080/02615479.2019.1703930

Wilson, T.E. (2017). Repairing what’s left in social work, or, when knowledge no longer cuts. British Journal of Social Work, 47(5), 1310-1325. http://doi.org/10.1093/bjsw/bcw114

 

Areas of Scholarship: Social work and environment; history and philosophy of social work; critical social theories; generational standpoints; social justice; social work rhetoric.

Areas of Practice: Homelessness; youth work; community work; program evaluation.