Learning about rural practice in Prince Rupert, BC

 

I am grateful to have had the opportunity to learn not only alongside Social Workers experienced in rural practice, but also from respected community members and knowledge holders of traditional teachings…

 

Photo of the Community of Lax Kw'alaams, BC

Community of Lax Kw’alaams, BC

The funding has allowed me to complete my 4th year practicum in my Bachelor of Social Work within an Aboriginal Organization on the ancestral and unceded territories of the Tsimshian Nation in Prince Rupert and nearby remote communities in Northern BC. Social Work practice in rural and Indigenous communities carries with it significant and unique contexts, which challenge the accepted approaches and practice models that I have encountered in my experiences in social service agencies in urban settings.

Photo of Prince Rupert Courthouse

Prince Rupert Courthouse

My experience working with a remote community partner was both challenging and enriching and extended far beyond anything I could have learnt within a classroom setting or from a book. I particularly enjoyed learning about helping practices and community-based justice initiatives which disrupt the culture of paternalism within many mainstream approaches of Social Work and contribute to a broader conversation about supporting and enhancing the well-being of Indigenous people in Canada on their own terms.

I am grateful to have had the opportunity to learn not only alongside Social Workers experienced in rural practice, but also from respected community members and knowledge holders of traditional teachings unique to the Nation I was a visitor in. I am grateful for the Tsimshian people who have allowed me to live and learn in their territory and have gifted me with their trust and their stories. I am grateful for the funding opportunity that allowed me to experience this richness of learning and expand my existing understanding of Social Work practice.